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Riccardo Nicholas Crestani

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Our phone number

After careful consideration we have decided to remove our landline phone number from the website. The reason is simple: it was being constantly used by call centers to sell services taking up too much time.

Therefore, if you want to contact us, send us an email or use the form in the CONTACT US page. We will get back to you and give you our cell phone number.

News

Online courses

Having started well before the Covid-19 emergency, we will continue to run distance learning English courses through Zoom, Skype and Microsoft Teams. Courses taught online include General, Business, Legal English or English for Teenagers. Please contact us for more information.

Reviews

Lost finale in English

Yesterday morning I got up early to watch the season finale of Lost on Fox (SKY). For the first time ever in Italy an episode was broadcast at the same time as in the American West Coast. It wasn’t shown in Italian, but in English (with no subtitles either). The same decision was taken by TV stations in Canada, Spain, UK, Portugal, Israel and Turkey, which were also set to simulcast the programme. The decision was probably taken as an attempt to discourage people from dowloading the episode from the Net.

Lifestyle

Facebook vs privacy

After much dithering I decided to abandon Facebook and have my account removed (Yes, it is possible! The procedure is illustrated – stangely enough – on a Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=16929680703). Tired of my privacy settings being ignored and of the amount of crap posted by people everyday, not to mention the amount of time spent in a day adding posts, adding “Like” to everything and reading the most absurd information people feel compelled to share, I quit.

student entries

Meeting foreign tourists in Montecchio

This morning we met some foreign tourists at Romeo and Juliet’s castles in Montecchio.

We first met three Iranians and then a Japanese couple. I noticed many differences between them: for example the Iranians were wearing dark and formal clothes, whereas the couple was wearing light and unformal clothes and it seems like if the Japanese people wanted to show a unity between their souls. The Japanese girl covered her head with an umbrella because she didn’t want to get tanned because in Japan white skin means richness.

Cross-cultural

Knives and napkins: where are they?

Let’s move to something different and lighter: differences when it comes to eating. The first day of my internship I was taken to an Asian Food court to eat. It is located on the fourth floor of a business complex known as Amara. You can eat Chinese, Hainanese, Indian, Korean, Japanaese and other typical Asian cuisine. I opted for Chinese cousine and chose something very light and not suspicious: rise, meat balls and vegatables. Everything fine with that.

Cross-cultural

Singapore, security and terrorism

As I previously wrote, Singapore is a very safe city and its citizens are proud of it. But nothing is as simple as it may appear to be. Security requires tighter controls and surveillance which clash with some of our basic rights. Why am I saying this? It’s fairly simple. Whenever you take the MRT (which refers to the underground), especially for long distances as I do, you keep hearing “If you see any suspicious looking person or article, please inform our staff. Or press the emergency communication button located at the side of the door”. I found this announcement rather amusing, but I was shocked when the first Sunday I was here I was waiting for the Train and I watched a video which clearly illustrated what a “suspicious looking person” was and what action the good and diligent citizen had to take.

Cross-cultural

Singapore and order: first impressions

Three things strike you when you get to Singapore: the green, security and order. If you think you’ll find the same mess as in China you are completely wrong. It’s nothing like that. Every detail is carefully looked after. Flower-beds and parks are cleaned nearly every day. Pavements are neat and so is every building. Even the underground is clean and you feel you can sit down without worrying about grease and dirt or a bad smell (I really can’t say the same about Milan…).

Cross-cultural

Arriving in Singapore

I’ve been in Singapore for over a month and I thought I’d share some comments on this incredible city. Please note that I didn’t have the time to get ready for this experience seeing as I only had a week to get everything up and running with lots to do before leaving Italy. So I will post some titbits as I come across them.

About this blog

This blog covers a wide range of subjects, from intercultural issues to English as a Foreign Language, hot topics in the news, TV programs of interest and much more!

Our articles are witten by Riccardo Crestani, a CELTA facilitator and translator and Maria Joy Whittaker, who has been living in Italy for over 30 years.

Feel free to post your comments!

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